Tag Archives: Cornbread

Stuffing!

20 Nov

Stuffing! 

There are few things I love more than Thanksgiving. And there are few things I love more on Thanksgiving than stuffing. Just in time for the big day, then, a stuffing post. 

Or do you call it dressing??

We grew up calling it stuffing. Even though we never stuffed a bird. My mom thought it was a bit gross to stuff a bird. Subsequently I never stuff the bird either. I hear from my dear and trusted friend Phyllis that stuffing the bird creates incredibly moist, tasty stuffing. I will have to try it sometime!

Thanksgiving Table 2013

Thanksgiving Table 2013

One thing I love about stuffing is how versatile it can be. Mom, for instance, made an incredible shrimp and crabmeat stuffing I can still taste to this day. During the year she would also make a southwestern stuffing, with green chilis, black olives and cheese. A good basic stuffing recipe is incredibly adaptable to almost any flavor. 

There is also the question as to white bread or corn bread. I say, why choose? Each year I have one of each at the table. So whether you call it dressing or stuffing or, um, Stove Top (Never, Ever, Ever), below are two terrific stuffing recipes, from two very good friends. Both these recipes are so good, I make them not only at Thanksgiving but throughout the year when I have that craving for stuffing. 

Remember first a few general stuffing notes:

* Stuffing tastes better over time so you can ease your Thanksgiving by making the stuffing the day before or even days ahead. Bake it, then it can sit in the fridge a day or two, getting more flavorful, or you can make it even a week before, freeze it, then reheat it (my trick.)

* You can make fresh vegetable stock in 30 minutes or fresh chicken stock in less than an hour. Fresh stock makes a world of difference. Just do it. Click here.

* Stuffing is not an exact science. I never ever follow these recipes to the exact amount and the stuffing is always is wonderful. Just taste as you go!

For the recipes, click here —>  Continue reading

The Cornbread of My Dreams

9 Mar

Certain dishes seem to have no middle ground. They’re either incredibly good or absolutely suck. This is not always true! While every prepared food certainly has great and bad versions, most can also have serviceable versions that do the job. Take the caesar salad. I’ve had a few out of this world caesar salads, like the tableside caesar at the Dal Rae  in Pico Rivera. Wow. I’ve had a few terrible caesars, too, that no one should ever have to eat. Most caesars, though, fall somewhere pleasantly in the middle. Not the best but easy and enjoyable to eat. Cheeseburgers (not talking fast food here! stay away, people) are the same. They can be great, they can be bad but usually they’re pretty good. This is why we see certain foods on just about every menu. A cook might not be able to craft a brilliant version, but chances are the cook won’t blow it terribly.

Other dishes, though, don’t have that serviceable in-between version. Meatloaf comes to mind. It seems always to be either wonderful — moist, spicy, delicious — or completely inedible — dry, tasteless, yuck. I rarely order meatloaf. The odds are too great it won’t be good. Cake is another. Has anyone here ever had “cake in the middle”? It’s always at either extreme. When you get a slice of incredibly moist cake with a great frosting, there doesn’t seem to be much better on the planet. But most cake is awful. There’s a magic to making cake most people don’t seem to be able to create, myself included. (I tend to be a disaster when it comes to baking.) Perhaps worst of all is gnocci. I hated gnocchi most of my life and couldn’t understand why anyone ate it because any time I tried gnocchi it was gummy, pasty, gross. Gnocci? Seriously? Then one day I had an amazing gnocchi — off someone else’s plate of course, they made me try —  and a light went off. Gnocci!  Seriously!

Click here for the rest of the post… and the best cornbread of your life